Is There too Much Water Behind Oroville Dam? Critics Say Army Corps Standards Unsafe

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Water flows through break in the wall of the Oroville Dam spillway, Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017, in Oroville, Calif. The torrent chewed up trees and soil alongside the concrete spillway before rejoining the main channel below. Engineers don't know what caused what state Department of Water Resources spokesman Eric See called a "massive" cave-in that is expected to keep growing until it reaches bedrock.  AP/RICH PEDRONCELLI

SOURCE CITED:  EMERGENCYMGMT.COM

There is a growing chorus of state officials and water policy experts calling for a fresh look at reservoir operations following last month’s near-catastrophe.

BY DALE KASLER, RYAN SABALOW AND PHILLIP REESE, THE SACRAMENTO BEE / MARCH 13, 20170

(TNS) - Long before a fractured spillway plunged Oroville Dam into the gravest crisis in its 48-year history, officials at a handful of downstream government agencies devised a plan they believed would make the dam safer: Store less water there.  Sutter County, Yuba City and a regional levee-maintenance agency brought their recommendation to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission in 2006, when FERC was considering the state’s application to relicense Oroville Dam.

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