For Dallas First Responders, Old East Dallas Attack Carries Echoes of July Ambush

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In this July 8, 2016 file photo, police check a car after a snipers opened fire on police officers in Dallas. Dallas police were the first in the nation to use a robot to deliver and detonate a bomb to kill a suspect, but other law enforcement agencies are willing and able to follow suit, including some that even have trained for the day when they’d have to do so. The killing of Micah Johnson using a robot-delivered bomb ended a night of terror in which he shot 14 officers, killing five of them, and also wounded two civilians.AP/LM OTERO

SOURCE CITED:  EMERGENCYMGMT.COM

BY TRISTAN HALLMAN AND NAOMI MARTIN, THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS / MAY 2, 2017

(TNS) - Radios crackled and cellphones buzzed Monday as word spread among Dallas first responders that one of their own had been shot in an apparent ambush.

Not again, many thought.

Ten months after July 7, when a gunman's rampage killed five officers and wounded nine more at a protest, the trauma is still fresh.

"I think everyone got a chill," said Sr. Cpl. Frederick Frazier, vice president of the Dallas Police Association. "I know I did."

The shooting forever changed life as a uniformed first-responder in Dallas. It put both departments on high alert. Although Dallas Fire-Rescue hasn't publicly sought attention for it, two firefighter-paramedics risked their lives on July 7, too. They drove into downtown Dallas to try to save an officer as the gunshots rang out.

Dallas Fire Fighters Association President Jim McDade said after the July 7 ambush, some people threatened firefighters by telling them they were next. Firefighters took on a "heightened sense of awareness" afterward, he said.

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